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Category: The Parents Lounge

What is “Summer Slide”?

The Parents Lounge
What is “Summer Slide”?

Donna Hall, M.Ed.

Have you ever had a child who made tremendous gains in their reading ability during the school year, and upon returning to school, your child’s new teacher advised your child was again having reading difficulties? You may have wondered how this is possible, or you may have even thought that the new teacher was just incorrect in the opinion because your child read very well at the end of the previous school year. This phenomenon is called the “Summer Slide”?

“Summer Slide” occurs because many children do not read during the summer. Reading is a skill just like playing sports, learning to play a musical instrument, or any other activity requiring practice to maintain or excel in the skills necessary to succeed in the activity. A child must continue reading practice over the summer in order to maintain the skills learned and maintain the abilities gained during the previous school year. In order to encourage reading during the summer, make reading fun and active. One way to encourage reading practice is to sign up for the Summer Reading Program at a local or nearby library. The libraries’ Summer Reading Programs offer incentives to read, weekly activities, and occasional guest readers or performers. The Creek County Literacy Program is also offering a class for parents of children age four to nine on May 19th from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. entitled “Creative Summer Reading Skills – Fun Activities to Prevent ‘Summer Slide’.” This class will provide engaging and fun summertime activities focusing on ways to practice reading skills. If you are interested in learning about this or to register, please contact the Creek County Literacy Program at 918-224-9647. I hope I see many of you at this class, and if not, I hope you will read my next blog in late July/early August.

 

Happy Summertime Reading, Everyone!

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Donna is a National Board Certified Teacher in Early Childhood, a Reading Specialist, and has a Master’s in Reading. She currently serves as a REAC3H Instructional Coach.

Creating a Positive Reading Climate

The Parents Lounge
Creating a Positive Reading Climate

Donna Hall, M.Ed.

Many times parents ask the best way to encourage their children to read.  First, I would create a positive reading climate in your home.  Here are some of my top suggestions:

  1. Model reading:  It is important for your children to see you actively engaged in reading.  Have magazines, books, etc. in your home.  Purchase a subscription to a children’s magazine for your child.  Let them see you reading.  Engage your children’s help in reading recipes, directions, etc. which is both engaging and sets a purpose for reading.
  2. Libraries/Bookstores:  Take your child regularly to the local public library.  Check with the library staff to see if there are any story times or activities your child can attend.  Help your child check out books that are of interest and at the correct reading level.  If you have a very young child, let them help you pick out a book to read.  Talk about the front cover of the books and guess what the book will be about.
  3. Phone Apps:  Download apps on your phone that promote reading skills.  There are many free apps online that can be downloaded to your phone, such as rhyming games, letter match, etc.  These apps can be very entertaining and educational not only at home, but when traveling.
  4. Reading Area:  Set aside a reading area for your child that is quiet, has comfortable seating, is well lit, and has a variety of materials for the child to read.  Just like adults, children like their own comfy space to relax and read.

These tips will get you started in creating a positive climate for reading.

Happy Reading!!!

Donna_Hall_Blog
Donna is a National Board Certified Teacher in Early Childhood, a Reading Specialist, and has a Master’s in Reading.  She currently serves as a REAC3H Instructional Coach.

Increasing Your Child’s Exposure to Oral Language

The Parents Lounge
Increasing Your Child’s Exposure to Oral Language

Donna Hall, M.Ed.

Oral language ability is a strong predictor of student success. For children to be successful when entering school, they must be flooded with hearing words. Research indicates beginning at birth children need to hear about 25,000 words per day. Yes, that is a lot of words to say in one day! So how can you, as a parent, accomplish this task?

  1. Begin reading books to children at birth. Set a goal of reading three children’s books per day.  Include nursery rhymes and poetry.
  2. As you go through daily activities, talk about what you are doing; i.e., “I am washing the dishes,” “Vacuuming the carpet keeps it clean,” etc.
  3. While driving, talk to your child about what you see and where you are going.
  4. When shopping, talk about and show your child items; i.e., “This is an apple. It is red. Apples are healthy for you.” “We are having salad for dinner. I need to purchase cucumbers.  Cucumbers are green.”
  5. Sing to your child. Even if you can’t carry a tune, children really don’t mind. Children love the sound and rhythm of song. 

Happy Reading and Singing!

Donna is a National Board Certified Teacher in Early Childhood, a Reading Specialist, and has a Master’s in Reading.  She currently serves as a REAC3H Instructional Coach.
Donna is a National Board Certified Teacher in Early Childhood, a Reading Specialist, and has a Master’s in Reading. She currently serves as a REAC3H Instructional Coach.